Fresh start in Punjab – The Hindu (March 15, 2017)

Fresh start in Punjab – The Hindu (March 15, 2017)

The Congress’s victory in Punjab, bagging 77 of the 117 seats in the Assembly elections, comes as a salve for the beleaguered party. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1:

  1. nudge (noun) – encouragement, prompt, prod/push.
  2. salve (noun) – something that is soothing/comforting/easing difficulties (ointment).
  3. beleaguered (adjective) – troubled, hard-pressed, under-stressed.
  4. feisty (adjective) – energetic, aggressive, strong/active.
  5. fend off (phrasal verb) – prevent, stop, block.
  6. foray (noun) – a brief attempt to get involved in a new activity/sphere.
  7. anti-incumbency (noun) – a situation which is against elected officials currently in power; discontent against ruling government/ party in power.
  8. stint (noun) – period, time, term (at a particular work).
  9. distaste (noun) – dislike, disfavour, aversion.
  10. consolidation (noun) – the process of strengthening something or the act of making something stronger.
  11. high-handedness (noun) – arrogance, heavy-handedness, rigidness/oppressiveness.
  12. disenchantment (noun) – disappointment, dissatisfaction, discontent.
  13. grassroots (adjective) – relating to or of people, general public, population.
  14. chunk (noun) – a significant amount of.
  15. formidable (adjective) – frightening, terrifying, threatening.
  16. agrarian (adjective) – relating to cultivating/farming.
  17. ravage (verb) – devastate, ruin, destroy.
  18. nourish (verb) – foster, maintain, entertain.
  19. trafficking (adjective) – relating to the activity of buying and selling goods/people illegally.
  20. nexus (noun) – junction/juncture, link; central point.
  21. revival (noun) – improvement, betterment; re-establishment.
  22. groom (verb) – prepare, train, make ready.

15MAR17_WL1Note:

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Assembly election results: U.P. and away – The Hindu (March 14, 2017)

Assembly election results: U.P. and away – The Hindu (March 14, 2017)

In the post-Mandal era, Uttar Pradesh, the country’s most populous State that is made up of diverse regions, has rarely witnessed a landslide, leave alone of such dimensions, in an Assembly election…. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1:

  1. landslide (adjective) – decisive, runaway (victory), overwhelming majority.
  2. interpret (verb) – understand, construe, take.
  3. denominational (adjective) – factional, partisan.
  4. populous (adjective) – densely/heavily populated.
  5. clutch (noun) – group, set, collection.
  6. marshal (verb) – usher, guide, escort/conduct.
  7. sundry (adjective) – several, various, diverse.
  8. sweep (noun) – win (all contests with a great majority).
  9. implication (noun) – hint, intimation, indication.
  10. dynamic (noun) – a force which makes change/progress with the system.
  11. tap (verb) – make use of, exploit, use/utilize.
  12. disgruntlement (noun) – disaffection, dissatisfaction, dis-contention/unhappiness.
  13. forge (verb) – build up, set up, create/establish.
  14. patriarch (noun) – a man who controls family/group/society/organization.
  15. incumbent (noun) – a person who is in office and holds power, functionary, official.
  16. electorate (noun) – all the people who entitled to vote in an election.
  17. patronage (noun) – backing, support/assistance, defence.
  18. abstract (adjective) – theoretical, conceptual, notional.
  19. expediency (noun) – advantage, benefit, convenience.
  20. perception (noun) – understanding, insight, intuition.
  21. ambivalent (adjective) – equivocal, uncertain/unsure, doubtful.
  22. majoritarianism (noun) – a philosophy that states that a majority (sometimes categorized by religion, language, social class, or some other identifying factor) of the population is entitled to a certain degree of primacy (priority) in society, and has the right to make decisions that affect the society (Courtesy: Wikipedia).
  23. pitch (noun) – level, intensity, point/degree.
  24. divisive (adjective) – isolating/separating, dividing; disharmonious.
  25. adhere (verb) – abide (by), stick (to), comply/cooperate (with).
  26. escalation (noun) – rapid increase, rise; intensification.
  27. subvert (verb) – destabilize, unsettle; undermine/weaken.

14MAR17_WLNote:

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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The stakes in Manipur – The Hindu (March 03, 2017)

The stakes in Manipur – The Hindu (March 03, 2017)

Manipur will vote in 38 of its 60 Assembly constituencies on Saturday in the first of two phases. This election is… For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1:

  1. blockade (noun) – disruption of the economic activities (e.g: supply of essential goods and others) of an area; siege, beleaguerment, encirclement.
  2. fancy (verb) – wish for, desire; think/imagine.
  3. discourse (noun) – debate, argument, discussion.
  4. run-up (noun) – a period/time before an important event.
  5. hold (noun) – influence, power, control.
  6. ethnic (adjective) – relating to a population subgroup (cultural, national, traditional/folk) with a common national or cultural tradition.
  7. fray (noun) – battle, engagement, conflict.
  8. grassroots (adjective) – relating to or of people, general public, population.
  9. momentous (adjective) – significant, important, crucial/critical.
  10. persistence (noun) – stability, continuance, permanency.
  11. disaffection (noun) – dissatisfaction, discontent, frustration.
  12. punitive (adjective) – penal, disciplinary, corrective.
  13. prevail upon (verb) – persuade, induce, coerce/influence.
  14. precipitate (verb) – expedite, advance, accelerate.
  15. insurgent (adjective) – rebellious, rebel, revolutionary.
  16. shore up (phrasal verb) – support, assist, buttress/strengthen.
  17. electorate (noun) – all the people who entitled to vote in an election.

03MAR17_WL1

Note:

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Withering highs – The Hindu (March 02, 2017)

Withering highs – The Hindu (March 02, 2017)

The forecast from the India Meteorological Department of above-normal temperatures over much of India in the summer months… For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-2:

  1. withering (adjective) – intense, extreme, fierce/strong.
  2. nudge (verb) – push, prompt, prod.
  3. mitigate (verb) – alleviate, reduce, lessen.
  4. bound to (adjective) – certain, sure, very likely.
  5. El Niño (noun) – it is a phenomenon during which the relationships between winds and ocean currents in the Pacific Ocean change, with an impact on weather conditions around the world (Courtesy: The Earth Observatory, NASA).
  6. exert (verb) – apply, utilize, deploy.
  7. prospect (noun) – expectation, anticipation, possibility.
  8. debilitated (adjective) – weakened, delayed, hindered.
  9. torrid (adjective) – hot, sweltering, scorching.
  10. replenish (verb) – refill, restore, fill up (again).
  11. reservoir (noun) – pool, lake, pond.
  12. correlate (verb) – connect, associate, relate.
  13. greenhouse gas (noun) – heat trapping gas; a gas (such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, etc) in the atmosphere that absorbs and emits radiation, causing greenhouse effect and warming of Earth’s temperature (Courtesy: VOA Learning English).
  14. “leapfrog” technology (noun) – it is the idea that areas/developing countries which have poorly-developed technology or economic bases can move themselves forward rapidly through the adoption of modern systems without going through intermediary steps. The mobile phone is a wonderful example of a “leapfrog” technology: it has enabled developing countries to skip the fixed-line technology of the 20th century and move straight to the mobile technology of the 21st.
  15. resilience (noun) – strength, toughness; flexibility.
  16. augmentation (noun) – increase, expansion, enlargement.

02MAR17_WL2Note:

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Resilience reaffirmed – The Hindu (March 02, 2017)

Resilience reaffirmed – The Hindu (March 02, 2017)

The resilience of India’s economy has been reaffirmed by the latest data, with both the third-quarter and full-year growth estimates…. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1:

  1. resilience (noun) – strength, toughness; the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties.
  2. reaffirm (verb) – assert, state, assure again strongly.
  3. belying (present participle of belie (verb)) – contradict, misrepresent, falsify.
  4. dampen (verb) – decrease, reduce, lower.
  5. suck (verb) – withdraw, remove, pull/draw/take out.
  6. aggregate (adjective) – total, whole, overall.
  7. demand shock (noun) –  it is a sudden event that increases or decreases demand for goods or services temporarily (Courtesy: Wikipedia).
  8. undergird (verb) – provide a support/basis.
  9. surge (verb) – upsurge, sudden increase, rise.
  10. stark (adjective) – clear, simple, blunt/plain.
  11. kharif crop (noun) – monsoon crops; Seeds sowing in the beginning of the monsoon and harvesting at the end of the season (oct-nov) in the South Asia.
  12. precede (verb) – foregoing, previous, prior.
  13. buck (verb) – resist, oppose, contradict.
  14. drag (noun) – hindrance, burden, inconvenience.
  15. halve (verb) – reduce by half (50%).
  16. in sync (phrase) – working well; in agreement.
  17. assertion (noun) – declaration, affirmation, announcement.
  18. understate (verb) – under emphasize, diminish, reduce.
  19. caveat (noun) – warning or caution of particular conditions/limitations/stipulations.

02MAR17_WL1

Note:

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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New ‘Words to the Wise’ from Merriam-Webster – VOA Learning English (Mar 02, 2017)

The American English dictionary Merriam-Webster recently added a lot of new words to its online site.

Learning English reporter Bryan Lynn looked into the changes. He’s joined me in the studio to talk about some of the new words.

Hi Bryan.

Hi Ashley.

First off, how often does Merriam Webster add words? Is this a yearly event?

No, actually it’s not. The last time the company added new words online was 2014. But an editor at large, Peter Solokowski, said Merriam Webster had been “watching” some of the added words for many, many years. Others, he said, were much newer in use.

So where do they come from?

Everywhere, really. I mean the new terms cover areas including science, technology, sports, pop culture. Most will probably be familiar to you.

Okay. So, for example…

Well, how about the verb “binge-watch?”

Oh yes. I binge watch television shows sometimes…always! That means to watch many episodes of a series in a short period of time. To binge, in this case, means to do a lot of something in a short amount of time.

Right…so in this case, I guess, watching one after the other for a few hours straight. Some people might watch a whole season of a show over a few days.

So here’s another from the list you collected: Seussian. Some Learning English fans outside America might not know this one.

Yeah, so Seussian is an adjective that refers to the American children’s book writer known as Dr. Seuss. He wrote these fantastical books for young children that included fun rhymes and colorful pictures.

Like “The Cat and the Hat” and “Green Eggs and Ham.”

“‘I will not eat them, Sam-I-Am.’” The books made you laugh but they also helped a lot of kids learn to read. So anything that reminds a person of a Dr. Seuss world could be Seussian.”

Okay. “Green Eggs and Ham” was the first book I ever read, actually. Another one on your list is photobomb. That’s when someone jumps in front of a camera uninvited. It’s usually done as a joke. I’ve seen some pretty funny photos that were the result of a really good photobomb!

Right, yeah. Photobombing is more of a prank. But, you know, it’s not meant “to throw shade on anyone.”

Oh, so I guess that is another newly added phrase, to throw shade?

Yes, it is. So, it is a slang expression that means to publicly express disrespect or dislike for someone. But to “throw shade” the insult or offense has to be subtle or understated.

Okay. So, among the new words are slang expressions, as well…

Correct. So, one of those is ghost.

We all know what that means as a noun, but…

Right, but as a verb it means to abruptly cut off contact.

Mhmm. I have friends who have been quite hurt by people who have just ghosted on them, without any explanation. It’s not a very nice thing to do.

Right, so I mean, with the slang words you could even pile on top, right? You could throw shade and also ghost the same person.

Oh…Okay, so here is another word on this list: microaggression. So is ghosting an example of microaggression?

Well, microaggression is a noun. It’s a comment or action that subtly and often unconsciously or unintentionally expresses a prejudiced attitude toward a member of a minority group.

Okay, so that sounds a little more serious than “ghosting.”

It is.

Alright, so this next word is not slang and I’m not really sure most people know what this one means: prosopagnosia.

Yes, so this is a noun and it does have a scientific meaning — the inability to recognize faces.

Okay, so like a face-blindness.

Exactly, that’s what it would be. Blind to faces.

Well, this has been really interesting, Bryan. Thanks for joining me in studio here. And to our listeners, let us know if you liked this and maybe we can do more of this in the future.

I’m Ashley Thompson.

And I’m Bryan Lynn.

This was originally published on the www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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‘Providing’ More Assistance With Prepositions – VOA Learning English (Mar 01, 2017)

English learners know that prepositions can be difficult to master. There are 94 one-word prepositions in English, and about 56 prepositions with two or more words, called “complex prepositions.” This adds up to 150 chances to make mistakes.

We cannot, of course, explain the small differences between all 150 prepositions here. We can, however, provide you with a few explanations of different prepositions that use one particular verb: provide.

Provide (someone) with:

When provide is followed by an indirect object, English speakers use the preposition “with.” Providing (someone) with something means to give something wanted or needed.

Here is an example sentence, written by [former] U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama: “Room to Read provides girls with scholarships that cover the cost of housing, food, and books.”

In this sentence, “girls” is the indirect object and “scholarships” is the direct object.

Provide for:

Another preposition with the same verb is “provide for.” “Provide for,” in general, means to make whatever is necessary for someone available to him or her. We often use this expression when we talk about parents providing for their family.

In a VOA Learning English story about a Cambodian-American filmmaker, we used the preposition in this way: “She says changes such as migration away from rural areas are allowing more women to find work and provide for their families.”

This preposition can also be used in other ways. “Provide for” can mean to make it possible for something to happen in the future. For example, in our story about water shortage in California, we wrote, “They say it [California] needs to find a way to provide for the growing need for water.”

Provide (something) to/for:

When “provide” is followed by a direct object, English speakers can use the prepositions “to” or “for.” Provide (something) to/for (someone) means that you deliver or give something to someone. For example, “The company provides health insurance to all of its employees.” “Health insurance” is the direct object and “employees” is the indirect object. In this example, we also could have said “The company provides health insurance for all of its employees.”

Both of these sentences are correct, but it is more common to use “provide (something) for” than “provide (something to)” someone. The expression using “to” is rather new to American English, according to the Internet application Google Ngrams.

Google Ngrams is an app that shows general changes in English usage by searching all the words in Google’s digital books.

The graph on Ngram for “provide (something) to” shows it was hardly ever used before 1960.

Google Ngrams Chart of Provide to

Compare that to the Ngram graph for “provide (something for).” The expressions appear more often. The expressions also appeared much earlier, around 1920. They were used then almost as often as they are used now.

EG1_02MAR17

Google NGrams Viewer Provide For

Understanding English prepositions can be difficult, even for native speakers! But we hope that we have been able to provide assistance to all of our listeners and readers.

I’m Kelly Jean Kelly.

Jill Robbins wrote this story for Learning English. Ashley Thompson was the editor.

EG2_02MAR17

Info Graphic on Provide and Prepositions

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Words in This Story

prepositionsn. a word or group of words that is used with a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase to show direction, location, or time, or to introduce an object

direct objectn. a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase which indicates the person or thing that receives the action of a verb

indirect objectn. a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase that occurs in addition to a direct object after some verbs and indicates the person or thing that receives what is being given or done

This article was originally published on the www.learningenglish.voanews.com  and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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US, Japan, S. Korea Explore Limits to N. Korea’s Arms – VOA Learning English (Mar 01, 2017)

The United States is increasing pressure on North Korea to cut back on its nuclear activities.

The U.S. government also wants to build ties with allies and partners in East Asia to deal with the rising threat of a nuclear-armed North Korea.

This week, the State Department released a statement on North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs. It said the programs directly threaten the security of South Korea, Japan and the United States.

South Korean, Japanese and U.S. officials met in Washington on Monday to discuss ways to restrict the money North Korea spends on weapons development.

The three said they “explored a joint way forward toward the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea.”

Joseph Yun is the State Department’s Special Representative for North Korea Policy. He led the meeting with Japanese and South Korean officials.

The discussions followed an earlier foreign ministerial meeting in the German city of Bonn. They were at least partly a reaction to North Korea’s latest ballistic missile launch on February 12.

The State Department noted: “The officials considered other possible measures under national authorities, including means to restrict further the revenue sources for North Korea’s weapons programs, particularly illicit activities.”

Stephen Noerper is a professor at Columbia University and serves as a director of the Korea Society. He says “human rights and financial measures” are two issues that have had the greatest effect on North Korea.

In the past, U.S. officials have threatened to send reports of human rights abuses by the government of Kim Jong Un to the International Criminal Court. The U.S. government also has taken steps to restrict the finances of North Korean individuals and groups.

Anthony Ruggiero is with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a research center in Washington. He told VOA that the U.S. Japan and South Korea should decide on new action against North Korea. He said the three should target North Korea’s provocative activities.

Ruggiero also said cooperation with China was important.

“Beijing should at least be part of the focus of renewed North Korea sanctions,” he said.

Stephen Noerper, however, notes that some Chinese officials have blamed U.S. actions for recent efforts by North Korea to expand its missile program.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson spoke with Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi on Tuesday. The two discussed what they called, the “mutually beneficial economic relationship” between the U.S. and China. But they also noted concerns about North Korean nuclear activities.

On Monday, Yang spoke briefly with U.S. President Donald Trump after he met with Trump’s national security adviser, H.R. McMaster. Yang also met with Trump’s adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

The United States, China, Japan and South Korea are all members of what diplomats call the six party talks. The two other members are North Korea and Russia.

The six party talks have been held at different times since 2003. The goal was to expand economic aid, security guarantees and diplomatic ties with North Korea in exchange for the North suspending its nuclear weapons program.

However, all six countries have not held talks since North Korea tested a nuclear device in 2009. That was one of five nuclear tests the country has carried out.

Some former U.S. officials say it is time to deal with North Korea in a different way. They say direct engagement with the North could help develop ways to avoid a possible conflict that is in no one’s interest.

I’m Mario Ritter.

Nike Ching and Victor Beattie reported this story for VOA News. Mario Ritter adapted it for Learning English with additional material from Reuters and AP. George Grow was the editor.

_____________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

ballistic missile – n. a missile that can travel long distances to strike a target

verifiable – adj. able to be proved true or made known

authorities – n. the power to give an order or do something

revenue – n. money that is earned through business activity

illicit – adj. not allowed, not lawful

provocative – adj. meant to cause a response or argument

mutually beneficial – adj. helping both sides equally

engagement – n. the act of being involved with someone or something

This was originally published on www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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Malaysia Charges Women in Kim Jong Nam Killing – VOA Learning English (Mar 01, 2017)

Malaysia has charged two women with the killing of the half-brother of North Korea’s leader at the Kuala Lumpur airport last month.

Siti Aisyah, a 25-year-old Indonesian, and Doan Thi Huong, a 28-year-old woman from Vietnam, appeared at a court in Kuala Lumpur under heavy security.

Court officials did not ask them to officially declare their innocence or guilt. Reuters news service reported that the court in which the women appeared would likely not be the one to try the murder case.

However, the women have said they did not knowingly attack the person identified as North Korean Kim Jong Nam. They said they believed they were taking part in a joke for a television program.

When the charges were read, Doan Thi Huong told the court, “I understand, but I am not guilty,” in English.

The two face the death sentence if found guilty.

Malaysian officials say the women attacked Kim Jong Nam using a powerful poison at the Kuala Lumpur Airport. He died 20 minutes later.

The officials say the poison was the deadly nerve agent VX.

Kim is the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Their father was former North Korean leader Kim Il Sung.

Malaysia has blamed North Korea for organizing the killing and is seeking additional suspects in the case.

On Tuesday, a North Korean delegation arrived in Kuala Lumpur seeking the body of the man.

North Korea’s official news agency has denounced the findings as the “height of absurdity.” It said the women could not have used such a poison without harming themselves and others.

Malaysia continues to hold the body of the man, who North Korea identifies only as Kim Chol, the name of his passport.

Incident has brought intense criticism of North Korea

The killing in Malaysia has caused some lawmakers in the United States to consider further punishments for North Korea.

Ted Yoho, a Republican representative from the state of Florida, says there is support for returning North Korea to the list of countries that support terrorism. Congress placed North Korea on the list after the bombing of a South Korean airplane in 1987 which killed 115 people.

North Korea was removed from the list in 2008 as part of a deal to reduce its nuclear program.

The State Department says the U.S. secretary of state must find that the North has “repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism” to return it to the list. Currently, three nations — Iran, Sudan and Syria — are on the list.

Experts disagree on whether the attack in Kuala Lumpur can be defined as an act of terrorism.

Joshua Stanton is a lawyer who specializes in sanctions. He says the killing along with North Korea’s many other acts means that North Korea should be returned to the list.

However, Daniel Benjamin, a former U.S. State Department counterterrorism official, says the case is very unusual and lies in a “gray zone.”

A State Department spokesperson told VOA that the department uses “all available information and intelligence, from a variety of sources” on North Korea.

The spokesperson added that, “even without being designated as a State Sponsor of Terrorism, North Korea remains among the most heavily sanctioned countries in the world.”

I’m Ashley Thompson.

Chris Hannas, Jenny Lee, Cho Eunjung and Baik Sungwon reported this story for VOA News. Mario Ritter adapted it for VOA Learning English. Caty Weaver was the editor.

We want to hear from you. Write to us in the Comments Section and share your views on our Facebook Page.

_____________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

plea –n. an official statement of guilt or innocence given in a court of law

absurdity –n. extremely foolish, making no sense

designate –v. to officially chose as, to identify something or someone as

sanctioned –adj. to be the subject of sanctions

This was originally published on www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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All, both, and everyone: How to use pronouns (2) – Cambridge Dictionary About words blog (Mar 01, 2017)

All, both, and everyone: How to use pronouns (2) – Cambridge Dictionary About words blog (Mar 01, 2017)

In my last post I looked mainly at personal pronouns such as he, them and yours. This post looks at some other common pronouns and at errors that students often make with them. For further reading, visit About words, a blog from Cambridge Dictionary.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Blog post written by: Liz Walter

Courtesy: Cambridge University Press

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