Crunch time at WTO – The Hindu (Dec 11, 2017)

Crunch time at WTO – The Hindu (Dec 11, 2017)

As leaders at the World Trade Organisation’s 11th biennial Ministerial Conference in Buenos Aires seek to define the future contours of multilateral global trade, the challenges the U.S. has….. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1 (To Improve English Vocabulary)

  1. crunch time (noun) – moment of truth, critical point, zero hour.
  2. biennial (adjective) – taking place/happening every two years.
  3. contour (noun) – outlineshapeform.
  4. mount on (verb) – produce, present, put in place.
  5. backing (noun) – support, help, assistance.
  6. trade-distorting farm subsidies – It is known in WTO parlance (language) as Aggregate Measurement of Support (AMS) or ‘Amber Box’ support, it said, adding that “Developed countries have more than 90% of global AMS entitlements amounting to nearly $160 billion. Most of the developing countries, including India and China, do not have AMS entitlements.” (Courtesy: The Hindu).
  7. contentious (adjective) – controversial, debatable, disputed.
  8. prerequisite (noun) – necessary condition, essential, requirement.
  9. prevailing (adjective) – existing, present, prevalent.
  10. imbalance (noun) – disparity, lack of harmony, unevenness.
  11. unravel (verb) – solve/resolve, clarify, decipher/explain.
  12. credence (noun) – credibility, reliability, plausibility/believability.
  13. scepticism (noun) – doubt, suspicion, disbelief.
  14. lukewarm (adjective) – unenthusiastic, half-hearted, uninterested.
  15. substantive (adjective) – important & meaningful.
  16. underpin (verb) – support, buttress, form (a basis).
  17. bolster (verb) – strengthen, support, reinforce.
  18. alleviation (noun) – suffering, reduction; soothing relief.
  19. trade-off (noun) – a situation in which you must choose between or balance two things that are opposite or cannot be had at the same time; a compromise; swap, exchange.
  20. stringent (adjective) – strict, firm, tough/rigorous.
  21. existential (adjective) – relating to existence.
  22. heighten (verb) – intensify, increase, make greater.
  23. combative (adjective) – aggressive, argumentative, contentious.
  24. appellate (adjective) – (of a court) dealing with cases on appeal to review the decision of a lower court.
  25. rhetoric (noun) – heroics, hyperbole/extravagant language.
  26. transient (adjective) – transitory, temporary, short-lived.
  27. downside (noun) – drawback, disadvantage, stumbling block.
  28. ill-afford (noun) – unable to afford; unable to bear/stand/sustain.
  29. lose sight of (phrase) – pay no attention to, fail to consider, be lax about.
  30. imperative (noun) – necessary condition, essential, requirement.

EDITORIAL WORDS TO IMPROVE ENGLISH VOCABULARY 11DEC17_1Note:   

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Everyday Grammar: Euphemistic Adjectives & Nouns – VOA Learning English (Dec 10, 2017)

This was originally published on www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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Know Your English: Are you a firecracker? – The Hindu (Dec 10, 2017)

Know Your English: Are you a firecracker? – The Hindu (Dec 10, 2017)

Why are the English sometimes called ‘limeys’? (L. Jayanth, Madurai)

Now that we have the Ashes series taking place Down Under, we may hear this word being used by some angry spectator…….

For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

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Courtesy: The Hindu

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Words and Their Stories: Expressions for the Road! – VOA Learning English (Dec 09, 2017)

Now, Words and Their Stories from VOA Learning English.

The United States is a big country with many, many roads. Many, if not most, of Americans depend on motor vehicles to get from place to place.

It goes without saying that, when talking or writing, Americans often use expressions with words from the world of automobiles. Now, let’s examine a few common expressions that come from parts of a vehicle.

First is the part of the car that protects the front and back of a vehicle — the bumper. The bumper is what suffers the most damage in a small accident.

The front bumper extends on both sides to the fender, which protects the front wheels. If your car hits someone else’s and causes a small amount of damage, we call it a fender-bender.

But let’s get back to the word bumper.

American traffic reporters often use the term bumper-to-bumper when describing heavy traffic. It means that vehicles are moving very slowly, and almost touching each other.

Americans can use the term bumper-to-bumper as an adjective. If you are late for dinner because of traffic, you can tell your friends, “Sorry, I’m late. But traffic was bumper-to-bumper.” They will understand.

Another part of a vehicle – mainly found on small trucks and on some models of cars — is the tailgate. This is the gate or doorway that opens up in the back of the vehicle. If your car or truck has one, you can lower the tailgate and sit on it.

This door on the back of larger passenger vehicles has led to something very American: the tailgate party. Tailgate parties usually take place in a parking area, where one or more of these vehicles are stopped. Their tailgates are open, with food or drinks available for the drivers and their passengers.

In the United States, tailgate parties are common at large sporting events or music shows.

Now, many cars do not have tailgates. That’s fine. If you spend time friends and others in a large parking lot before a rock concert or a big game, you are still tailgating!

So, that form of tailgating is fun. But it is not fun when someone is tailgating your vehicle. A tailgater is someone who drives much too close to the back of your car. At best, this can be a pain, if not making you, the driver, really angry. But tailgating is also dangerous and the cause of many rear-end accidents.

There are other behaviors that can lead to a traffic accident.

Let’s take rubber necking, for example. Rubber necking is when drivers slow down on a road to look closely at a wreck or something else eye-catching as they are passing.

Some drivers can stretch their neck far out of the window to see something like a serious crash. This is where we get the term. Drivers who rubber neck, however, can create their own accidents. First, they slow down, causing problems for other drivers and affecting the flow of traffic. But more importantly, they aren’t looking at the road in front of them!

The first rule of driving should always be look where you are going! Another rule should be, stay calm.

The most dangerous kind of driving behavior is road rage. This is anger or violence towards other drivers. Road rage is such a big problem in some areas, that local governments have laws that make some acts of road rage illegal.

The road hog is more of a pain than dangerous. To hog something means to take too much of something. So, a road hog takes up too much of the road. The road hog sometimes drives in two lanes of traffic. Other times, they may not let other motorists pass them.

And that bring us to the end of our road and this episode of Words and Their Stories! Next time you take a drive, you’ll be able to talk about your fellow drivers.

And with any hope, you won’t run into any rage road. I’m Bryan Lynn.

And I’m Anna Matteo.

Have you ever run into any of these of drivers on the road? Let us know in the Comments Section.

Anna Matteo wrote this story for VOA Learning English. George Grow was the editor. At the end of the show, Willie Nelson sings “On the Road Again.

______________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

neck – n. the part of an animal that connects the head with the body

rage – n. violent and uncontrolled anger

parking – n. a large area of public land kept in its natural state to protect plants and animals

This was originally published on the www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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English in a Minute: Old Habits Die Hard – VOA Learning English (Dec 09 2017)

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This was originally published on www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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Rights & wrongs – The Hindu (Dec 09, 2017)

Rights & wrongs — The Hindu (Dec 09, 2017)

It will be a travesty of its avowed objectives if the proposed legislation to protect the rights of transgender persons is not sufficiently rooted in a rights-based approach. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-2 (To Improve English Vocabulary)

  1. travesty (noun) – misrepresentation, distortion, perversion/poor imitation.
  2. avowed (adjective) – asserted, admitted, stated (publicly).
  3. objective (noun) – aim, intention, target/purpose.
  4. brush aside (phrasal verb) – dismiss, disregard, ignore.
  5. entitle (verb) – qualify, authorize, allow.
  6. conform (verb) – abide by, obey/observe, follow.
  7. discrimination (noun) – prejudice, bias/bigotry, inequity.
  8. accord (verb) – give, grant, tender someone (status/recognition).
  9. affirmative (noun) – positive, supportive, sympathetic/sensitive.
  10. binary (noun) – something having two parts.
  11. provision (noun) – term, clause; condition.
  12. benevolent (adjective) – kind, compassionate/sympathetic, benign.
  13. imbue (verb) – inject, instil/ingrain; fill.
  14. marginalised (adjective) – minor, insignificant/unimportant, powerless.
  15. autonomy (noun) – independence, freedom/liberty, individualism.
  16. come up with (phrasal verb) – produce, propose, put forward/present.

EDITORIAL WORDS TO IMPROVE ENGLISH VOCABULARY 09DEC17_2Note:   

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Countering hate — The Hindu (Dec 09, 2017)

Countering hate — The Hindu (Dec 09, 2017)

It is an ongoing investigation and very little can be said with certainty about the back-story of the murder of a Bengali migrant worker in Rajasthan’s Rajsamand district. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1 (To Improve English Vocabulary)

  1. swiftly (adverb) – quickly, rapidly, fast.
  2. explicitly (adverb) – clearly, unequivocally, without any confusion/doubt.
  3. denounce (verb) – condemn, criticize, decry/censure.
  4. rant (verb) – shout, yell, roar  (angrily & impassionedly).
  5. ramble (noun) – an act of talking at length in a confused manner.
  6. prima facie (adverb/adjective) – something (first impression) considered as right until proved.
  7. unsound (adjective) – disordered, troubled; not well.
  8. subscribe to (verb) – agree with, accept/believe in, support.
  9. majoritarian (adjective) – relating to a philosophy that states that a majority (sometimes categorized by religion, language, social class, or some other identifying factor) of the population is entitled to a certain degree of primacy (priority) in society, and has the right to make decisions that affect the society.
  10. rhetoric (noun) – heroics, hyperbole/extravagant language.
  11. deliberate (noun) – planned, premeditated, preplanned.
  12. discourse (noun) – discussion, conversation, debate.
  13. provoke (verb) – encourage, stimulate, excite.
  14. post-hoc (adjective) – happening or done after the event.
  15. provocative (adjective) – annoying, provoking, inflaming/arousing.
  16. heinousness (adjective) – an act which is considered as wicked, horrible, terrible.
  17. sheer (adjective) – utter, total, complete.
  18. venality (noun) – an act of showing dishonest, fraudulent, untrustworthy.
  19. sectarian (adjective) – denoting a sect (group of people).
  20. heighten (verb) – intensify, increase, make greater.
  21. polarize (verb) – to divide into two different contrasting  groups/beliefs, etc,.
  22. unambiguous (adjective) – undeniable, undebatable, unquestionable.

EDITORIAL WORDS TO IMPROVE ENGLISH VOCABULARY 09DEC17_1Note:   

  1. Click each one of the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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The Experiment: Phrase Frenzy – sport – BBC Learning English (Dec 08 2017)

The Experiment: Phrase Frenzy – sport – BBC Learning English (Dec 08 2017)

Source: BBC-Learning English

Terms Of UseThis post is reproduced under licence from www.bbc.co.uk/.  You are not allowed to modify, edit, reproduce, republish the contents of this post for any personal/commercial use and any form of reproduction of the contents of this post is strictly prohibited. You can access to view & listen to the contents (of this post) provided you comply with the Terms of Use of BBC Online Services.
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English @ the Movies: ‘Put Your Foot Down’ – VOA Learning English (Dec 08 2017)

This English @ the Movies phrase is “put your foot down.” It comes from the funny movie “Inside Out,” about a young girl and the emotions inside her head. At one point, her dad gets so mad, he ends up having to put his foot down. What does that mean? Find out.

This was originally published on "VOA Learning English" and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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News Words: Bureaucracy – VOA Learning English (Dec 07, 2017)

In a bureaucracy, one can expect a lot of paperwork and wait times.

This video was originally published on VOC Learning English and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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