Words and Their Stories: Seeing an Eclipse Is Good! Being Eclipsed Is Not – VOA Learning English (Aug 19, 2017)

Hello and welcome to Words and Their Stories from VOA Learning English.

On this program we explore the origin and usage of common expressions in American English. We always give examples or dialogues using the expressions. Sometimes we even use the words in a short story. All of these can, hopefully, teach you how to best use the expressions.

For today’s word we turn our eyes toward the sky!

There is one natural event that many people want to experience during their lifetime — an eclipse!

Whether solar or lunar, partial or total, these astronomical events bring the movement of our solar system a little more to life.

Solar, as we know, means “relating to the sun.” So a solar eclipse happens when the moon passes between the sun and Earth. A dark circle either completely or partly covers the sun as a result.

Lunar means “related to the moon.” So, a lunar eclipse is when the moon looks as if it is completely or partially covered with a dark circle.

Some ancient cultures considered an eclipse a sign that the world was ending. Other cultures viewed it as a battle between different animals in the sky as they try to eat up the moon or sun. Another cultural belief was that an eclipse was a time for deep thought and thinking about the past.

The word eclipse comes from a Greek word meaning “to leave,” “to abandon,” “to forsake a usual place” or fail to appear.” Ancient Greeks thought of an eclipse as a time when the sun abandoned the earth.

In simple terms, an eclipse happens when a planet or satellite blocks the light of the sun. So, it is not surprising that we also use “eclipse” in the same way when talking about other things besides the sun, the moon and the earth.

In conversation, when one thing eclipses another it makes it less important or popular. For example, television eclipsed radio in the 1950s as the most popular form of home entertainment. When one person eclipses another, they do something better. For example, a younger child might hate it when her older sister’s school and sports success eclipses her own. The older sister outshines the younger one.

This usage of eclipse is not only used when talking about people. Things can also eclipse other things, as in this sentence: The popularity of the company’s new product quickly eclipsed all its earlier products.

Many synonyms of eclipse deal with light and casting shadows, like in the example of the older sister outshining the younger. If a person or a thing outshines another, the light they give off is so bright that no one notices anything else. You could also say the older daughter cast a shadow on her younger sister. Or you could say the younger sister was living in the shadow of her older sister.

Now, let’s hear how we use eclipse this way in everyday conversation. Let’s listen as two people talk as they wait in line to audition for a Broadway musical.

Are you ready for your singing audition today?

As ready as I’ll ever be. The song I’m singing is my favorite and I know it really well.

I’m sure you’ll do great. By the way, I’m Corrine. Corrine Mayfield.

I’m Steve Stravinski.

Stravinski? Wait. Are you any relation to Doug Stravinski?!

Yeah. He’s my older brother.

Get out! His performance in Les Miserables was amazing. Critics are still talking about it! Wow! Doug Stravinski. What is he working on these days?

An album. His fourth album.

That is just awesome! It will probably be another number one seller! So, what’s it like being his brother?

Great. Just great.

It must be tough living in the shadow of Doug Stravinski!

I don’t think about it … you know, until someone brings it up.

Oh, I’m so sorry. But it’s just that … well, he’s so amazing and famous. He casts a really big shadow!

Yes. Look, do you mind if we don’t talk? I really need to prepare for my audition.

Of course. Of course. It’s so typical, isn’t it — an older brother or sister eclipsing a younger one. They get to try everything first and do it longer. So, they’re usually better — usually the shining star in the family!

Hm-hmm.

Listen to me! I’m doing it again, aren’t I? I am sure at this audition you are going to outshine everything your brother Doug has done on stage.

Yep. Thanks.

Next person!

Hello I’m next.

Name?

Steve Stravinski.

Stravinski? Wait, are you related to Doug Stravinski?! THE Doug Stravinski?! Oh man, he’s amazing! I saw him in this show …

And that’s the end of this Words and Their Stories!

Do you use the word “eclipse” like this in your language? Let us know in the Comments Section.

I’m Anna Matteo.

 

Anna Matteo wrote this story for VOA Learning English. Caty Weaver was the editor. The song at the end is Bonnie Tyler singing “Total Eclipse of the Heart.”

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Words in This Story

 

astronomical – adj. of or relating to astronomy

shadow – n. a dark shape that appears on a surface when someone or something moves between the surface and a source of light

abandon – v. to leave and never return to (something)

forsake – v. to give up or leave (someone or something) entirely

conversation – n. an informal talk involving two people or a small group of people : the act of talking in an informal way

entertainment – n. amusement or pleasure that comes from watching a performer, playing a game, etc.

synonym – n. a word that has the same meaning as another word in the same language

casting – v. to send (something) out or forward : The fire casts [=gives off] a warm glow. The tree cast a long shadow on the lawn.

audition – n. a short performance to show the talents of someone (such as an actor or a musician) who is being considered for a role in a play, a position in an orchestra, etc. — often + for

get out – informal exclamation : used to express disbelief.

tough – adj. difficult to accomplish, resolve, endure, or deal with

typical – adj. normal for a person, thing, or group : average or usual

shining star – n. the best

This was originally published on the www.learningenglish.voanews.com and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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Barcelona horror – The Hindu (Aug 19, 2017)

Barcelona horror – The Hindu (Aug 19, 2017)

A vehicular attack to maximise casualties and spread panic is now a well-tested terrorist strategy in European cities. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1

  1. plough (into) (verb) – ram, crash into, smash into, collide with.
  2. lone wolf (noun) –  a person who likes to do to things on his/her own.
  3. meticulous (adjective) – careful, precise, scrupulous.
  4. rip (through) (verb) – move quickly/rapidly.
  5. at large (phrase) – escaped, free, on the run.
  6. grapple with (verb) – struggle, deal with, tackle.
  7. counterpart (noun) – a person who serves the same job/function but in a different location; equivalent.
  8. thwart (verb) – block, prevent, stop.
  9. jihadist (adjective) – (in Islam) relating to a person who supports jihad (holy war).
  10. beef up (phrasal verb) – strengthen, reinforce, consolidate.
  11. multitude (noun) – a lot, a large/great number, a host of.
  12. fumble (verb) – move awkwardly; make efforts to do something.
  13. paradigm (noun) – model, pattern, example.
  14. on this score (phrase) – on that subject/matter, so far as that is concerned, in this respect.
  15. strain (verb) – struggle, labour, try very hard/strive.
  16. suboptimal (adjective) – below the highest standard/level/quality.
  17. intra- (prefix added to adjectives) – within.
  18. culminate (verb) – come to a climax; come to an end with, terminate with.
  19. foil (verb) – thwart, prevent, obstruct.
  20. notwithstanding (preposition) – in spite of, despite, regardless of.
  21. unenviable (adjective) – difficult, undesirable, unpleasant.
  22. disperse (verb) – scatter, disseminate, spread.
  23. determined (adjective) – resolute, single-minded, unwavering.

19AUG17_WL2Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Politics of probe – The Hindu (Aug 19, 2017)

Politics of probe – The Hindu (Aug 19, 2017)

In ordering a judicial inquiry into the circumstances leading to the death of former Chief Minister Jayalalithaa, Tamil Nadu Chief Minister…. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1

  1. set piece (noun) – a part/section of the play/story arranged/elaborated for maximum effect.
  2. faction (noun) – a small group, section, division (of dissenter within a large group).
  3. put forward (phrasal verb) – propose,, suggest, recommend.
  4. fulfil (verb) – accomplish, execute, perform.
  5. accede (verb) – agree to, accept/endorse, surrender to.
  6. distance from (verb) – denounce, remove/detach, separate.
  7. consumption (noun) – the reception of information by the people.
  8. pave the way for (phrase) – prepare for, clear/open the way for, usher in,.
  9. retrieval (noun) – repossession, getting back, recapture/reclamation.
  10. by all accounts (phrase) – reputedly, apparently/seemingly, ostensibly.
  11. no longer (phrase) – not now as formerly; not any more.
  12. inheritor (noun) – heir, successor, next-in-line.
  13. legacy (noun) – something given by a predecessor (to his/her successor).
  14. yield (verb) – generate, produce, earn.
  15. dividend (noun) – benefit, advantage, gain.
  16. shortcomings (noun) – fault, flaw, imperfection/defect.
  17. bidding (noun) – command, order,/demand, instruction.
  18. submission (noun) – yielding, capitulation, agreement/compliance.
  19. ally (noun) – associate, colleague, supporter/partner.
  20. scenario (noun) – course of events, situation.
  21. aid (verb) – help, assist, abet.

19AUG17_WL1Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Son vs Bezos – The Hindu (Aug 18, 2017)

Son vs Bezos – The Hindu (Aug 18, 2017)

Flipkart’s announcement that SoftBank Vision Fund, a private equity fund backed by Japanese billionaire Masayoshi Son, would take a stake in…. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-2

  1. up (verb) – increase, raise,expand/extend.
  2. stake (noun) – share, interest, investment.
  3. war chest (noun) – money/fund set aside to use for business (for a particular activity at difficult times).
  4. surpass (verb) – excel, outclass, beat/conquer.
  5. take on (phrasal verb) – compete against, oppose, face/challenge.
  6. materialise (verb) – happen, take place, occur.
  7. allure (noun) – attraction, glamour, temptation.
  8. predominantly (adverb) – mainly, mostly, commonly.
  9. bricks-and-mortar (phrase) – conventional business models (like retail shops in a building).
  10. pursuits (noun) – business activity, business interest, trade.
  11. take off (phrasal verb) – succeed, do well, progress/flourish.
  12. count on (phrasal verb) – trust, put one’s faith in, rely/depend on.
  13. backing (noun) – support, help, assistance.
  14. give/lose ground (phrase) – lose one’s advantage during a competition.
  15. rejuvenated (adjective) – revived, restored, renewed.
  16. fray (noun) – battle, engagement, tussle.
  17. evolve (verb) – develop, progress, advance.
  18. come up with (phrasal verb) – introduce, propose, put forward/present.
  19. woo (verb) – persuade, try to attract, tempt.

18AUG17_WL2Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Academic Writing: Common Patterns, Part 1 – VOA Learning English (Aug 17, 2017)

EG_17AUG17

The new school year is beginning in communities across the United States.

Many students are busy at work in their new classes. Some are already thinking about all the homework they will face in the weeks to come.

Schools often require students to read academic articles — short or long reports about a class-related subject. Teachers also ask students to write book reports and research papers.

Today on Everyday Grammar, we will explore two grammatical structures that you will see often in academic writing.

We will show you how to use these structures. We also will show you when not to use them.

#1 Evaluating an idea

If you are writing or reading for academic purposes, you will likely see the following structure: It + is + an adjective + that-clause.

This is a common way to express an attitude, opinion or position. It is often used when considering an idea, note grammar experts Susan Conrad and Douglas Biber.

Here is an example:

“It is clear that the evidence is inconsistent.”

EG1_17AUG17

Here is how you can understand the sentence. The subject in our example is the word it. Then comes the verb is. After is, there is an adjective: the word clear.

After clear, there is a that-clause. A that-clause is a group of words, beginning with the word that. It has a subject and a predicate. A predicate is the part of a sentence that expresses what is said about the subject.

The that-clause has the idea that the writer is considering. In the example we gave you, the idea under consideration is the following statement: “the evidence is inconsistent.”

The adjective clear suggests the writer’s judgment.

By saying “it is clear,” the writer is saying that he or she agrees the evidence appears to be conflicting with other information.

Note that the writer did not write, “I think that the evidence is inconsistent,” even if it has the same meaning as the example sentence. Why? We will explore that issue later in the report.

Academic writers often use it + is + an adjective + that-clause to raise questions, note possibility, and express importance.

For example, you might read the following sentence:

“It is unlikely that the results will be conclusive.”

Or,

“It is likely that the information was incomplete.”

In the former case, the writer is using the adjective unlikely to raise questions. In the latter one, the writer is using the adjective likely to express possibility.

#2 Evaluating an action

A second common structure, it + is + an adjective + an infinitive phrase, is often used to judge an action. The infinitive phrase describes the action. The adjective shows the writer’s evaluation.

EG2_17AUG17

Consider this example:

“It is difficult to define these ideas.”

In this example, the infinitive to define relates to an action, while the adjective difficult shows the writer’s evaluation.

Writers often use it + is + an adjective + an infinitive phrase to show possibility, difficulty, importance, and so on.

So, for example, you might read the following sentences: “It is hard to understand these effects,” or “It is necessary to carry out further research.”

In the former example, the writer is expressing difficulty, while in the latter the writer is expressing necessity.

Other ways to express the same ideas

The two structures we have discussed are common in academic writing.

You should try using them with your own adjectives, that-clauses, infinitive phrases, and so on.

There is one point to keep in mind, however. You should know that sometimes you might not want to use these structures – especially if you are writing for business or even artistic reasons.

In those situations, it might be better to use more direct language.

Consider the first example we gave you, “It is clear that the evidence is inconsistent.”

This is a common, acceptable way to write a sentence for academic purposes. It is grammatically correct.

However, the statement uses indirect language to express an evaluation. The writer is expressing an opinion without specifically writing “I think…,” for example.

However, if you are writing for other purposes other than college professors, you could simplify your language. You could give a very direct evaluation by writing “I think the evidence is inconsistent,” or simply “The evidence is inconsistent.”

The structure that you choose to use depends on what kind of writing you are doing.

It is difficult to improve your writing. But with practice, you can do it!

I’m John Russell.

And I’m Pete Musto.

John Russell wrote this story for Learning English. George Grow was the editor.

We want to hear from you. Write to us in the Comments Section.

_____________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

 

that-clause – n.  a part of a sentence (beginning with that) that has its own subject and verb

evaluate – v. to judge the value or condition of (someone or something) in a careful and thoughtful way

inconsistent – adj. having parts that disagree with each other

conclusive – adj. showing that something is certainly true

data – n. facts or information used usually to calculate, analyze, or plan something

infinitive phrase – n. an infinitive phrase is a group of words consisting of an infinitive, objects, and modifiers

concept – n. an idea of what something is or how it works

academic – adj. of or related to a school, especially of higher education

article – n. a piece of writing or story about a subject

verb – n. a word that expresses an action, event or state of being

 

This article was originally published on the www.learningenglish.voanews.com  and reproduced here with permission.

Courtesy: Voice of America

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Choice & conversion – The Hindu (Aug 18, 2017)

Choice & conversion – The Hindu (Aug 18, 2017)

The case of Akhila/Hadiya is becoming curiouser by the day. Entrusted with adjudicating whether her conversion to Islam and marriage to a Muslim man were voluntary acts,.. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1

  1. muddle (verb) – bewilder, confuse, perplex/puzzle.
  2. curiouser (comparative adjective) curious (adjective) – inquisitive, intrigued, interested.  
  3. by the day (phrase) – gradually and steadily.
  4. entrust (verb) – assign, give the responsibility for, charge/confer on.
  5. adjudicate (verb) – judge, adjudge, give/declare a verdict (on a disputed matter).
  6. embark (on) (verb) – begin, start, commence (a course of action).
  7. roving (adjective) – relating to the act of looking something thoroughly in all directions.
  8. radicalise (verb) – to make someone to be radical (to take extreme step) on political or social issues.
  9. inexplicably (adverb) – in a way something can not be accountable /explainable/ understandable.
  10. annul (verb) – nullify, invalidate, cancel.
  11. stakeholder (noun) – a person with an interest in something.
  12. comprehend (verb) – understand, grasp, apprehend/fathom.
  13. veracity (noun) – truthfulness, accuracy, correctness.
  14. in the course of (phrase) – during; as a part of specified activity.
  15. radical (adjective) – revolutionary, extreme, extremist.
  16. purported (adjective) – claimed, professed/pretended; alleged.
  17. ruse (noun) – tactic, trick, cunning plan.
  18. scuttle (verb) – deliberately cause to fail; hurry/hasten.
  19. sham (noun) – pretence, fake, fraud.
  20. odd (adjective) – strange, unusual, peculiar/weird.
  21. presumably (adverb) – probably, in all likelihood, undoubtedly.
  22. suspicion (noun) – doubt, trace/hint, scepticism.
  23. under a spell (phrase) – under someone’s control.
  24. apprehension (noun) – anxiety, concern; understanding, perception.
  25. plea (noun) – claim, explanation, justification.
  26. cut no ice (phrase) – have no effect.
  27. lent past participle of lend (verb) – give, provide, add.
  28. curtailment (noun) – reduction, decrease, restriction.
  29. on one’s own volition (phrase) – voluntarily, by choice, by one’s own preference.
  30. strive (verb) – try, attempt, make an effort.

18AUG17_WL1Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
Posted in Editorials (The Hindu), The Hindu | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Trump’s misstep – The Hindu (Aug 17, 2017)

Trump’s misstep – The Hindu (Aug 17, 2017)

White nationalist rallies are not new in the United States. But the demonstrations in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Friday and Saturday were unprecedented in recent American history in terms of…. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-2

  1. misstep (noun) – mistake, blunder.
  2. neo-nazi (noun) – authoritarian/totalitarian/nationalist, extreme right-winger, far right-winger.
  3. counter protester (noun) – a protester who protests against an existing protest.
  4. unprecedented (adjective) – not done or experienced before.
  5. turn up (phrasal verb) – come, be present, attend.
  6. the far right (noun) – the extreme right wing of a political party.
  7. supremacist (adjective) – relating to someone supporting the supremacy of a particular group, especially a racial group.
  8. reminiscent (adjective) – similar to, comparable with, bearing comparison with.
  9. Confederate monuments – monuments honor Confederate leaders, soldiers, or the Confederate States of America in general during the American Civil War and the monuments can be can be found in public spaces across the country, USA. (Courtesy:Wikipedia) (confederate (adjective) – federal, united, allied).
  10. mobilise (verb) – organize, encourage, stimulate/prompt.
  11. ram (verb) – crash into, collide with, bump into.
  12. alt-right (noun) – right-wing, conservative, rightist.
  13. embolden (verb) – give courage, make brave, encourage.
  14. Imperial Wizard (noun) – The highest-ranking leader of the Ku Klux Klan.
  15. Ku Klux Klan (proper Noun) – KKK; a secret organization/society of the right-wing in U.S organized to confirm white supremacy.
  16. denounce (verb) – condemn, criticize, censure/reject.
  17. ultranationalist (noun) – a person with extreme nationalism.
  18. uphold (verb) – maintain, sustain, continue.
  19. enshrine (verb) – to enclose in, preserve, treasure, protect (as valuable).
  20. apparently (adverb) – seemingly, evidently, it seems/it appears.
  21. alt-left (noun) – leftist or anti-fascist activists whose objectives are to remove racism, white supremacy and totalitarianism. (some researchers say that there is no proper definition for alt-left and it is simply created as an opposite to ‘alt right).
  22. swastika (noun) –  an ancient symbol (used as the emblem of the German Nazi party).
  23. anti-semitic (adjective) – relating to the hostility to, prejudice, or discrimination against Jews (Courtesy:Wikipedia).
  24. intolerance (adjective) – bigotry/narrow-mindedness;  inequality, discrimination.
  25. pardon (noun) – forgiveness, absolution, remission/mercy.
  26. endorsement (noun) – support, backing, approval.

17AUG17_WL2Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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The health checklist – The Hindu (Aug 17, 2017)

The health checklist – The Hindu (Aug 17, 2017)

The frail nature of rural India’s health systems and the extraordinary patient load on a few referral hospitals have become even more evident from the crisis at the Baba Raghav Das Medical College in Gorakhpur. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-1

  1. frail (adjective) – weak, fragile, delicate.
  2. referral hospital (noun) – large hospital providing health care from specialists after referral from primary care and secondary care.
  3. the spotlight (noun) – the public eye, the focus of public/media attention/interest.
  4. epidemic (noun) – outbreak; a situation in which a disease spreads quickly and affects many people (Courtesy: VOA Learning English).
  5. mortality (noun) – (in a particular time/for a cause) the rate of death.
  6. chronic (adjective) – long-lasting, constant, continuing.
  7. as a last resort (phrase) – a final course of action when all else has failed.
  8. dysfunctional (adjective) – something which is not operating properly.
  9. template (noun) – model, pattern, blueprint.
  10. ambitious (adjective) – determined/demanding, formidable, challenging.
  11. outlay (noun) – expenditure, expenses, spending.
  12. sustained (adjective) – continuous, uninterrupted, non stop.
  13. requisite (adjective) – necessary, prerequisite, essential/vital.
  14. scale up (phrasal verb) – increase.
  15. deplorable (adjective) – abysmal, very bad, awful/terrible.
  16. infectious (adjective) – contagious, communicable, transmittable/spreadable.
  17. imperative (noun) – necessary condition, requisite/requirement, necessity.
  18. public good (noun) – a commodity or service that is given to the public by the government/private organization/individual (without profit).
  19. single-payer system (noun) – a healthcare system in which the government (financed by taxes) covers health care costs for all residents regardless of income, occupation, or health status.
  20. strategic purchase (noun) –  “Purchasing” refers to the allocation of pooled funds to providers that deliver healthcare goods and services to the covered population, as per the defined benefit package.”Strategic purchasing” means active, evidence-based engagement in defining the service-mix and volume, and selecting the provider-mix in order to maximize societal objectives. Improving the strategic purchasing of health services is central to improving health system performance and making progress towards universal health coverage (UHC). (Courtesy: WHO)

17AUG17_WL1Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
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Make a splash! (Everyday idioms in newspapers) – Cambridge Dictionary About words blog (Aug 16, 2017)

Make a splash! (Everyday idioms in newspapers) – Cambridge Dictionary About words blog (Aug 16, 2017)

Every few months on this blog, we read a selection of national newspapers published on the same day and pick out the idioms that we find in the articles and reports. We read the news, the gossip columns and the sports pages and, as with previous posts, include only the most frequent, up-to-date idioms. For further reading, visit About words, a blog from Cambridge Dictionary.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Blog post written by: Kate Woodford

Courtesy: Cambridge University Press

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Making friends – The Hindu (Aug 16, 2017)

Making friends – The Hindu (Aug 16, 2017)

In theory, the two factions of the All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam have every reason to merge. The original cause of….. For further reading, visit “The Hindu”.

This preview is provided here with permission.

Courtesy: The Hindu

Word List-2

  1. ally (noun) – associate, colleague, supporter/partner.
  2. faction (noun) – a small group, section, division (of dissenter within a large group).
  3. preside over (verb) –  be in charge of, head, manage/administer.
  4. assertive (adjective) – confident, bold, decisive/determined.
  5. shepherd (verb) – guide, conduct, lead.
  6. rescind (verb) – revoke, repeal, cancel/reverse.
  7. retrieve (verb) – get back, repossess, regain.
  8. break-away (adjective) – separatist, rebel, dissenting.
  9. short-hand (noun) – a short and simple way of expressing something.
  10. pelf (noun) – (money (gained in a dishonest way).
  11. distrust (noun) – mistrust, suspicion, wariness/misgiving.
  12. wield (verb) – exercise, exert, manage/control.
  13. cosy up to (phrasal verb) – ingratiate/intimate oneself with; try to become a friend to oneself (for some advantage).
  14. et al.  (abbreviation for  for the Latin phrase et alia) – and so on, and so forth, and the rest/and others.
  15. foothold (noun) – hold, grip, anchorage/purchase.
  16. eat into (phrasal verb) – use up, utilize.
  17. corruption-tainted (adjective) – relating to someone whose name is damaged/affected with corruption charges.
  18. non-domineering (adjective) – non-pressurizing, non-intimidating, non-dominating.
  19. there is no telling (phrase) – used to say “not knowing what will happen next”.

16AUG17_WL2Note: 

  1. Click each one en.oxforddictionaries.com/…ition/foremostof the words above for their definition, more synonyms, pronunciation, example sentences, phrases, derivatives, origin and etc from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/.
  2. Definitions (elementary level) & Synonyms provided for the words above are my personal work and not that of Oxford University Press. Tentative definitions/meanings are provided for study purpose only and they may vary in different context. Use it with the corresponding article published on the source (website) via the link provided. 
  3. This word list is for personal use only. Reproduction in any format and/or Commercial use of it is/are strictly prohibited.
Posted in Editorials (The Hindu), The Hindu | Tagged , | Leave a comment